How to write a memo lab report

There are several different types, such as incident, investigative, progress, and trip reports as well as proposals. Each has its own objectives and styles, appropriate for the particular situation it is reporting about. The investigative type, which analyzes data and seeks to answer why or how something happens under certain conditions, will be used in this laboratory course.

How to write a memo lab report

You will report the results of your lab analyses as if you were writing an internal company memo to your supervisor. The memo should be no longer than two pages or four pages, depending on the assignment instructions. The memo should be single-spaced with double spacing between the paragraphs.

In many cases, after two pages your "supervisor" will stop reading and you will not receive credit for work completed on following pages.

Raw calculations should be included as appendices and will not be counted against your two page limit. You should include the following information in your memo.

how to write a memo lab report

Introduction Your introduction should briefly describe the analysis you have completed. This section is where you should outline the purpose and objectives of your analysis and give the reader sufficient background to understand the rest of the report.

You can assume that the reader of your memo is familiar with the procedures for your analyses. Limit your material to that which is pertinent to your experiment. Materials and Methods You only need to reference the procedure you used for your analysis and make notes of any changes you made while performing the procedure.

You will most often need to reference the lab assignment write-up. Results Present your final results from the analysis. Start this section with a brief description of what it is that your data shows. Give your reader a context in which to view the data.

Present only your final numbers. Do not include any raw data, calibration curves or calculations. This other information raw data, calibration curves or calculations should be included as an appendix containing Xeroxed copies of the relevant sections of your field or lab notes.

Discussion You should explain your results and their ramifications. You can include details of the principles, relationships, generalizations, and consequences of your experiment. You must demonstrate that you understand your investigation and corresponding results.

Be sure to relate your interpretation and discussion back to your objectives. Do your data answer your original question?

You should also include a discussion of possible errors and exceptions.

Memo Writing

If relevant or available, discuss how your results compare pertinent standards. Conclusion Summarize the major points of your memo. A good conclusion is usually quite short.

A few sentences should be sufficient. Restate your numerical results, but do not editorialize about your results.

Statements such as, "We learned a lot about the importance of nitrogen in water quality," have nothing to do with the technical content of your memo. If you felt there were problems with the procedure or equipment make sure that information is conveyed through your discussion section.

Appendices Your raw data and calculations should be included in your appendices. You may copy pages out of your lab or field notes if appropriate. If appropriate, a calibration curve should be included.

When working in groups, you should include an accounting of individual tasks and time spent on the group project. Be detailed in this accounting. Writing Hints A portion of the grade for each lab memo will be based on the writing itself. Be as clear, direct and concise as you can. Grammar, spelling, clarity, and style will all be considered.

Use the active voice "Our group analyzed samples" rather than the passive voice "One hundred samples were analyzed by our group". Pay attention to tense.

When describing established, factual material, the present tense can be used. A discussion section is generally written in the present tense. Even though you are discussing past results, you are interpreting them now.Sep 08,  · Expert Reviewed.

How to Write a Biology Lab Report. Seven Parts: Creating Your Title Page Writing Your Introduction Listing Material and Methods Explaining Results Drawing a Conclusion Crediting References Formatting Your Report Community Q&A Biology lab reports have a specific format that must be followed to 77%(29).

Lab Report. Writing a lab report is something which seems to be very easy, but on the contrary, is time consuming and not understandable. If you lack ideas of how to write a lab report – you will need a qualified assistant to help you write a lab report, to show you a sample lab report, provide a lab report example, and answer any questions on lab .

Lab Memos are an abbreviated form of a formal Laboratory Report. You will report the results of your lab analyses as if you were writing an internal company memo to your supervisor.

The memo should be no longer than two pages or four pages, depending on the assignment instructions. Contents Writing Exercises Writing Courses. This web page presents an example of a memo report [Herwald, ].

Note that different memo formats may have . Short Form MEMO Style Reports. Short reports are generally in response to a specific request from a supervisor or a client. There are several different types, such as incident, investigative, progress, and trip reports as well as proposals.

Writing a Memo Report One format for presenting your lab results is to write a memo report. In this case the audience is your Findings: If your memo is longer than a page (which it will be for a lab report) you should include a summary section at the beginning of the memo.

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